The Acre bazaar was completely deserted for a period of 450 years, since the year 1291, when the Crusaders were banished. After this period a new city was built on top of the remains of the Crusader city. The building was begun by a Bedouin ruler, Dahar Al-Omer (1750 – 1775) who established an independent kingdom in the Galilee and made Acre its capital. He renovated the city walls, cleaned the port and built his private palace in the city.

in 1775 the city of Acre was attacked by an Egyptian Ottoman officer by the name of Ahmed Al-Jazar, who executed Dahar Al-Omer as a rebel against the Ottoman regime. Ahmed Al-Jazar carried on the work of Dahar Al-Omer and established Acre as the main commercial city of the entire region. During the period of Al-Jazar many mosques, bathhouses, khans and bazaars were built to serve the citizens of the city.

The Turkish Bazaar was built at the end of the 18th century as a municipal market to serve the local population. The market was deserted in the year 1948 with the capture of the Old City by the IDF, and opened recently as an artisans and artists bazaar. The bazaar now contains small shops specializing in the sale of souvenirs and objects d’art to tourists. The bazaar is open all week long until 18:00. During the festival period it is open to the public until much later. 
The White Market (Shuq Al-Abiad)

The market was built by Dahar Al-Omer, destroyed in a fire and rebuilt by Suleiman Pasha in 1817. It takes its name from the white limestone from which it is built.
The market is unusual in character, since the street and the market are designed as a single unit. The plan of the building includes a vaulted ceiling above the street, with small shops barrel vaulted ceilings. The high vaults in the center, the apertures and the light all give the market a light and attractive nature. The passageways become narrower in an almost uniform manner as they extend in the direction of thecity and the width of the hall is uniform along its entire length

Historical background